Drug & Alcohol Abuse Prevention

Introduction

Stevenson University is an innovative, coeducational, independent institution offering undergraduate and graduate students a career-focused education marked by individualized attention, civility, and respect for difference. In order to achieve our mission, the health and safety of members of the Stevenson University community are of primary concern to the institution. The main goal of Stevenson’s drug and alcohol program is to help all members of the community understand the health risks associated with the abuse of alcohol and illicit drugs and to provide appropriate support and resources for those members who may be struggling with their own usage. In order to fulfill this primary goal, Stevenson strives to develop, articulate and enforce clear policies for students and employees. Further, the institution seeks to provide relevant and effective educational programs for members of the university community, particularly students, surrounding the impact of abusing alcohol and illicit drugs.

Stevenson’s drug and alcohol program is guided by the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA), which requires that colleges develop a drug and alcohol abuse prevention program that includes (a) a written statement about its standards of conduct that prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees; (b) a written description of legal sanctions imposed under federal, state, and local laws for unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol; (c) a description of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol; (d) a description of any drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation or re-entry programs that are available to students and employees, and (e) a statement that the institution will impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees for violations of the intuitions’ codes of conduct and a description of such sanctions. The drug and alcohol abuse prevention program must be distributed annually, in writing, to each employee and to each student who is taking one or more classes for any type of academic credit (except for continuing education units), regardless of the length of the student’s program of study.

On March 1, 2017, the Governor of Maryland declared a state of emergency in response to the heroin and opioid crisis. According to the 2020 Annual Report produced by Maryland’s Opioid Operational Command Center, after seeing a decrease in 2019 in opioid-related fatal overdoses for the first time in more than a decade, the number of opioid-related deaths in Maryland increased in 2020. There were 2,499 opioid-related deaths which represents an 18.7% increase from 2019. This figure also represents the largest annual total of opioid-related deaths on record. While heroin related deaths decreased by 25% when compared to 2019, increases were witnessed in deaths related to fentanyl and prescription opioids. Finally, Baltimore County, the county in which Stevenson University is located, reported 353 opioid-related intoxication fatalities in 2020.

Stevenson continues to devote a specific section of this document to heroin and opioid education. Stevenson requires new full-time students to participate in heroin and opioid addiction and prevention awareness training during their first year at Stevenson. This training is typically offered in-person during New Student Orientation. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, an online program was utilized for the 2021-2022 academic year. Further, medical professionals in the Wellness Center and all full-time Security Officers at Stevenson University have been trained on symptom recognition and medication administration procedures. In addition many of the part-time Security Officers have been trained as well and, in several cases, they received this training as part of their full-time work as firefighters and EMTs.

Finally, as part of our prevention efforts, we wish to highlight the institution’s Good Samaritan Policy as well as the State of Maryland’s Good Samaritan Law. Under Stevenson University’s policy, students who seek medical attention for themselves or their fellow students related to consumption of alcohol or other drugs will not be charged with a violation of Stevenson University policies and/or the Guidelines for Student Housing. Students, however, may be required at the discretion of the Dean of Students (or designee) to complete an alcohol assessment/alcohol education and/or a drug assessment/drug education program depending on the severity of the student’s situation. The purpose of Maryland’s Good Samaritan Law is to encourage any person, regardless of age, who experiences or observes a medical emergency caused by the ingestion or use of alcohol or other drugs, to seek medical assistance without fear of arrest or prosecution for: possessing or using a controlled dangerous substance; possessing or using drug paraphernalia; providing alcohol to minors.

For your convenience, Stevenson’s Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program is presented below based on the heading of each section.  A full copy of the report is available here.

Standards of Conduct Regarding Alcohol

The health and safety of members of the Stevenson University community are the primary concerns of the University. It is the University’s policy to uphold the alcohol laws of the state of Maryland. Possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages is permitted only by those who are at least 21 years of age. Alcoholic beverages are not to be furnished to or consumed by minors. Members of the Stevenson community and guests are expected to accept responsibility for their actions, to obey the law and to police their own behavior. Individuals who violate the law, in addition to being subject to criminal penalties, will be subject to University disciplinary measures. These specific policies that follow apply to Stevenson University events both on and off campus.

  1. Except as permitted by the following paragraphs, the possession, use or distribution of alcohol by students, faculty, staff, and guests on university property or in connection with any University activity is strictly forbidden.
  2. All University-sponsored events where alcohol is served, either on or off campus, must be approved by the Vice President, Student Affairs or Chief of Staff in the President’s office 30 days prior to the event. The Event Application Request for Service of Alcoholic Beverages will serve as a formal application for approval.
    1. All individuals attending the event must be of legal drinking age. Student organizations may request an exception to this guideline if the primary purpose of the event is other than a social drinking party and the majority of the guests are of legal drinking age.
    2. The organization’s adviser or an alternative faculty/staff member must be present for the duration of the event.
    3. Security must be present for the duration of the event.
  3. Alcohol may only be served by a licensed caterer trained to serve alcohol.  Caterers must provide proof of license and training certification to the University prior to the event.  A list of approved caterers is included with the Event Application Request for Service of Alcoholic Beverages.
  4. Proper proof of age must be provided to the server.
  5. Kegs, multi-liter containers and pitchers used for the serving of alcohol are not allowed at student-sponsored events.
  6. At events where alcohol is served, substantial food and non-alcoholic drinks must be provided. During late night events, the service of alcohol will stop one hour prior to the ending time of the event.
  7. It is recognized that this document cannot address, in specific fashion, all possible social situations that may occur. Where these procedures are not specific on a particular point, individual and organizational hosts are expected to conduct their social events and themselves in the spirit of social responsibility consistent with these procedures.

Rules Specifically Applicable to University Housing 

Residents of legal drinking age may drink alcohol in their residence hall apartment or suite only if they are not in the presence of residents or guests who are under 21 years of age. Absolutely no alcohol is permitted in any shared space in a residence hall room/suite/apartment where underage students reside.  Alcohol may not be served or consumed in any common areas of the University’s residential facilities including but not limited to hallways, lounges, quad areas, and parking lots. Guests are expected to abide by the University’s rules while visiting SU housing. Students may be held responsible for the conduct of their guests. The Residence Life staff will confiscate or require underage residents to dispose of alcohol they observe being brought or having been brought into the residences and to stop consumption of alcoholic beverages in all common areas. Kegs, beer balls, and other multi-liter containers are not permitted in SU residence halls. The Residence Life staff will inform students of University policy, clarify if they are violating the University’s policy, and counsel them regarding the consequences of their behavior, both in terms of health and safety risks and legal consequences. Students in violation of the housing agreement or University policy will be held accountable. The Residence Life staff is to report offenders to the Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs & Conduct. The students involved will meet with the Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs & Conduct or a professional Residence Life staff member to determine appropriate sanctions if warranted. Any student failing to meet with a Residence Life staff member will be subject to termination of the housing contract for failure to comply with directions of a University official. 

Standard Sanctions for Alcohol Violations

Students:
First time violators may be subject to:

  • Formal warning
  • $100 fine and/or discipline service
  • Participation in an alcohol education program designated by the University

Second time violators may be subject to:

  • $150 fine and/or discipline services
  • Housing probation
  • Parental notification (official warning letter sent to the student with a copy mailed to the student’s parents/guardians)
  • Participation in an alcohol education program or referral for treatment designated by the University

Students with subsequent alcohol violations will generally be subject to one or more of the following:

  • Increased fine, referral for treatment, removal from residence, and termination of the students’ Housing Contract and/or suspension and/or expulsion from the University

Employees
Employees who violate Stevenson University’s alcohol policy are referred to the University’s Human Resources Office and are subject to disciplinary actions up to and including termination of employment and/or referral for prosecution as appropriate.

Reporting Use and Misuse

Each member of the Stevenson community is advised to report all suspicions of unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol or of alcohol abuse to Stevenson University’s Security Office in the Ratcliffe Community Center on the Owings Mills campus or by calling 443-352-4500.

Standards of Conduct Regarding Unauthorized Drugs

The Stevenson University community affirms unauthorized drug use to be contrary to the goals of the University. The use, possession (including constructive possession), manufacture, distribution and solicitation of controlled dangerous substances, drug paraphernalia, look-alike drugs, unauthorized legal drugs, man-made or naturally occurring substances or inhalants used for the purpose of altering behaviors, mood, or for changing the brain or nervous system, and over-the-counter drugs/medications or prescription drugs in excess of the recommended or prescribed dosage(s) is strictly prohibited on Stevenson University property, Stevenson sponsored travel, or in connection with any program or activity sponsored or endorsed by Stevenson University.

Standard Sanctions for Unauthorized Drugs

Students

Violations of the University’s Drug Policy are considered serious and may result in suspension, dismissal or expulsion from the University. Students who are found to be distributing drugs will be expelled from the University. Students who are found in possession of large quantities of drugs may also be expelled from the University as the large quantity, by itself, may be viewed as intent to distribute.

Employees

Employees who violate Stevenson University’s Drug Policy are referred to the University’s Human Resources Office and/or are subject to disciplinary actions up to and including termination of employment and referral for prosecution as appropriate.

Reporting Use and Misuse

Each member of the Stevenson community is advised to report all suspicions of unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol or of alcohol abuse to Stevenson University’s Security Office in the Ratcliffe Community Center on the Owings Mills campus or by calling 443-352-4500.

Good Samaritan Policy

Stevenson University is committed to the health and safety of its students and strives to maintain policies that support this commitment. In an effort to maintain the health and safety of the campus community, the University has instituted this Good Samaritan Policy. Under this policy, students who seek medical attention for themselves or their fellow students related to consumption of alcohol or other drugs will not be charged with a violation of Stevenson University policies and/or the Guidelines for Student Housing. Students, however, may be required at the discretion of the Dean of Students or designee to complete an alcohol assessment/alcohol education and/or a drug assessment/drug education program depending on the severity of the student’s situation.

Stevenson University prohibits the use of alcohol on campus for those under the legal drinking age of 21 and the use of unauthorized drugs. Alcoholic beverages are not to be furnished to, possessed or consumed by those less than 21 years of age. Students of legal drinking age may drink alcohol in their apartments/suites only if they are not in the presence of residents or guests who are under 21 years of age. The University recognizes that due to these prohibitions, students may unwisely choose not to call for medical assistance when another student is experiencing alcohol intoxication or a potential overdose situation due to the sanctions that the University might impose upon them. Should a student become intoxicated or involved in a potential overdose situation, Stevenson University implores individuals, regardless of age, to seek medical assistance for themselves or others in an attempt to keep the campus community safe.

This Good Samaritan Policy applies only to those students who seek emergency medical assistance in connection with an alcohol or other drug related emergency and does not apply to individuals experiencing an alcohol or other drug emergency who are found by University personnel (e.g., Campus Security, Residence Life, University administrators). Similarly the Good Samaritan Policy only applies to alcohol and other drug related emergencies and does not apply to other unacceptable forms of behavior such as assault, property damage, or distribution of illegal substances. Likewise, the Good Samaritan Policy does not prevent action by police or other law enforcement personnel who are required to abide by Maryland State law.

Stevenson University students are expected to act responsibly. In cases where repetitive violations of Stevenson University’s policies and/or Guidelines for Student Housing occur, the Dean of Students or designee reserves the right to take judicial action on a case-by-case basis regardless of the manner in which the incident was reported.

Standards of Conduct Regarding Tobacco

Stevenson University is committed to a policy of creating a smoke-free environment in all its facilities and in providing a healthy, comfortable environment for students, faculty, staff, and guests. Smoking is not permitted in any building on the Greenspring or Owings Mills campuses. In order to create a healthier environment:

  • All areas within 15 feet of building entrances are designated smoke-free zones.
  • The space between the Dawson Academic Center and the Manuszak Center Buildings on the Greenspring Campus will be designated smoke-free due to the close proximity of these two buildings.
  • Cigarette receptacles will be placed 15 feet from building entrances.
  • Proper signage will be posted indicating “Smoke-Free Zones”.
  • Enforcement will be by self-governance of the campus community.
  • The Wellness Center is available to meet with students and discuss referrals to the Baltimore County Health Department for smoking reduction and cessation education classes.

Legal Sanctions Under Federal, State, and Local Laws

It is the policy of Stevenson University to uphold federal, state, and local laws with regards to alcohol and other drug violations.  In addition to being subject to University disciplinary measures, individuals who violate the law are also subject to criminal penalties.  Further detail regarding possible legal sanctions and penalties are described below.

Federal Trafficking Penalties

The below tables contain a description of federal penalties and sanctions for illegal trafficking and possession of a controlled substance. These charts were downloaded from Drugs of Abuse: A DEA Resource Guide, pages 36-37, on August 13, 2020.

FEDERAL TRAFFICKING PENALTIES

DRUG/SCHEDULEQUANTITYPENALTIESQUANTITYPENALTIES
Cocaine (Schedule II)500–4999 grams mixtureFirst Offense: Not less
than 5 yrs, and not more
than 40 yrs. If death or
serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not less
than 10 yrs, and not more
than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
5 kgs or more mixture
First Offense:
Not less
First Offense: Not less
than 10 yrs, and not more
than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
 
Second Offense: Not less
than 20 yrs, and not more
than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75
million if not an individual.
 
2 or More
Prior Offenses:
Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
Cocaine Base (Schedule II)28–279 grams mixture280 grams or more mixture
Fentanyl (Schedule II)40–399 grams mixture400 grams or more mixture
Fentanyl Analogue
(Schedule I)
10–99 grams mixture100 grams or more mixture
Heroin (Schedule I)100–999 grams mixture1 kg or more mixture
LSD (Schedule I)1–9 grams mixture10 grams or more mixture
Methamphetamine
(Schedule II)
5–49 grams pure or
50–499 grams mixture
50 grams or more pure or
500 grams or more mixture
PCP (Schedule II)10–99 grams pure or
100–999 grams mixture
100 gm or more pure or
1 kg or more mixture
PENALTIES
Other Schedule I & II
drugs (and any drug
product containing Gamma
Hydroxybutyric Acid)
 
 
Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)
Any amount
 
 
 
 
 
1 gram
 
First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs,
or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.
 
Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.
Other Schedule III drugsAny amountFirst Offense: Not more than 10 years. If death or serious injury, not more that
15 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2.5 million if not an individual.
 
Second Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not more than 30 yrs. Fine not more than $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.
All other Schedule IV drugsAny amount
First Offense:
 Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1
million if not an individual.
 
Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual.
Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)Other than 1 gram or more
All Schedule V drugsAny amount
First Offense:
 Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than $100,000 if an individual,
$250,000 if not an individual.
 
Second Offense: Not more than 4 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an individual,
$500,000 if not an individual.

FEDERAL TRAFFICKING PENALTIES – MARIJUANA

DRUGQUANTITY1st OFFENSE2nd OFFENSE*
Marijuana (Schedule I)1,000 kg or more marijuana mixture; or 1,000 or more marijuana plantsNot less than 10 yrs. or more than
life. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs., or more than life. Fine not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if other than an individual.
Not less than 20 yrs. or more than
life. If death or serious bodily
injury, life imprisonment. Fine
not more than $20 million if an
individual, $75 million if other
than an individual.
Marijuana (Schedule I)100 kg to 999 kg marijuana mixture; or 100 to 999 marijuana plantsNot less than 5 yrs. or more than 40 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if other than an individual.Not less than 10 yrs. or more than
life. If death or serious bodily
injury, life imprisonment. Fine
not more than $20 million if an
individual, $75million if other
than an individual.
Marijuana (Schedule I)More than 10 kgs hashish;
50 to 99 kg marijuana mixture
 
More than 1 kg of hashish oil;
50 to 99 marijuana plants
Not more than 20 yrs. If death or
serious bodily injury, not less than
20 yrs. or more than life. Fine $1
million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual.
Not more than 30 yrs. If death
or serious bodily injury, life
imprisonment. Fine $2 million if
an individual, $10 million if other
than an individual.
Marijuana (Schedule I)Less than 50 kilograms marijuana
(but does not include 50 or more
marijuana plants regard-
less of weight)
 
1 to 49 marijuana plants;
Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000, $1 million if other than an individual.Not more than 10 yrs. Fine
$500,000 if an individual, $2
million if other than individual.
Hashish (Schedule I)10 kg or less
Hashish Oil (Schedule I)1 kg or less

*The minimum sentence for a violation after two or more prior convictions for a felony drug offense have become final is a mandatory term of life 
imprisonment without release and a fine up to $20 million if an individual and $75 million if other than an individual. 

State of Maryland Penalties and Sanctions Relating to Alcoholic Beverages and Controlled Substances

All members of the Stevenson University community are subject to the alcohol laws of the state of Maryland.  A good source for reviewing Maryland’s underage drinking, fake ID, and impaired driving laws is Maryland’s Motor Vehicle Administration.  For convenience, the following laws are highlighted below:

Underage Drinking: Under the laws of Maryland, no individual under the age of 21 may purchase, possess, or consume alcoholic beverages. Violators of this law face a fine of $500 for a first offense and $1,000 for second or subsequent offenses.  If you are over 21 and knowingly furnish alcohol to a minor, you face a fine of up to $2,500 for a first violation and a fine of up to $5,000 for a second or subsequent violation.

Fake ID Laws: If you are under 21 and in possession of a fake ID, you face a fine of up to $500 and up to two months in prison.  Twelve points will be assessed on your driving record and your driver’s license may be suspended or revoked.  If you are caught selling fake IDs, you face fines of up to $2,000 and up to two years in prison for each fake ID sold. You are also subject to prosecution for violating federal and homeland security laws.

Impaired Driving: The state of Maryland aggressively enforces impaired driving laws. The penalties for being found guilty of Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol (DUI) are a $1,000 fine and up to one year in jail. Also, twelve points will be assessed on your driving record and your license may be revoked for up to 6 months. The penalties for being convicted of Driving while Impaired by Alcohol (DWI) is a $500 fine and up to two months imprisonment. Also, eight points will be assessed on your driving record and you face a 6-month suspension of your license. The penalties of violating either law are higher for a second offense and they are substantially higher if you are transporting a minor at the time of the offense or for a third offense. For additional information regarding these laws, students and employees should refer to Maryland’s Motor Vehicle Administration.

All members of the Stevenson University community should be aware that important changes to Maryland’s drunk driving laws went into effect on October 1, 2016. On this date, The Drunk Driving Reduction Act of 2016 (also known as Noah’s Law) took effect. Noah’s Law significantly expands Maryland’s Ignition Interlock Program and also significantly increases driver license suspension periods for immediate Administrative chemical test failure and refusals. For additional information, students and employees should refer to Maryland’s Motor Vehicle Administration.

Marijuana: 

Sanctioning guidelines for the state of Maryland, which were updated in November of 2020, may be found by accessing the following link provided by the Maryland State Commission on Criminal Sentencing Policy (MSCCSP): http://msccsp.org/Files/Guidelines/offensetable.pdf. Specific information related to alcoholic beverages may be found beginning on page 2 of the MSCCSP document. Information related to CDS & paraphernalia may be found beginning on page 8. Finally, information related to Prescription Drugs and Other Substances may be found on page 43. For convenience, the below chart provides a summary of sanctioning guidelines for selected offenses. However, students and employees are encouraged to review all the relevant sanctioning guidelines in the MSCCSP document.

OffenseSourceFelony or Misd.Max
Term
Fine
Alcoholic Beverages
Intoxicated and endanger safety of person or property; or intoxicated or drink alcoholic beverage in public place and cause public disturbance
AB, §6-320Misd.90 Days$100
CDS and Paraphernalia
Manufacture, distribute, or dispense controlled dangerous substances near schools or on school vehicles, 1st offense
CR, §5-627Felony20 Years$20,000
CDS and Paraphernalia
Manufacture, distribute, or dispense controlled dangerous substances near schools or on school vehicles, subsequent
CR, §5-627Felony40Y
 
Mandatory Minimum = 5Y
$40,000
CDS and Paraphernalia
Using minors for manufacture, delivery, or distribution of controlled dangerous substances.
CR, §5-628(a)(1)Felony20Y$20,000
Prescription Drugs and Other Substances
Harmful substances – distribution; possession with intent to distribute; instruction in the unlawful inhaling; or distribution of butane can to minor
CR, §5-709Misd.18M$1,000
Weapons Crimes – In General
Possess, use, wear, carry, or transport a firearm in a drug offense, 1st offense
CR, §5-621(c)Felony20Y
 
MM = 5Y
Weapons Crimes – In General
Possess, use, wear, carry, or transport a firearm in a drug offense, subsequent
CR, §5-621(c)Felony20Y
 
MM = 10Y

Pertinent Baltimore County Maryland Code Provisions*

Public Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages – § 17-1-103

Students and employees should be aware that in Baltimore County, Maryland, a person may not possess an alcoholic beverage in an open container (1) On public property, property used by the public, or a highway; or (2) In a vehicle that is located on public property, property used by the public, or a highway. A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor.  (1988 Code, § 20-2) (Bill No. 114-99, § 3, 7-1-2004)

Synthetic Cannabinoid – § 17-1-118

“Synthetic cannabinoid” means a material, substance, compound, mixture or preparation in any form that would reasonably indicate under all circumstances to be synthetic marijuana, including but not limited to products known as Spice, K2, Scooby Snax, Potpourri, or any other name.

“Synthetic marijuana” means a psychoactive substance or compound created with man-made synthetic chemicals that, when consumed or ingested, mimics the intoxicating effects of marijuana THC, the psychoactive ingredient in the naturally grown marijuana plant.

A person may not purchase, use or possess a synthetic cannabinoid. A person may not distribute a substance: (i) That the person represents is any form of synthetic cannabinoid;

(ii) That the person intends for use or distribution as a synthetic cannabinoid; or
(iii) Under circumstances that one reasonably should know that the substance will be used or distributed for use as a synthetic cannabinoid.
 

A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction is subject to a fine not exceeding $500 or imprisonment not exceeding 60 days or both.  Property seized in connection with enforcement of this section is subject to forfeiture in accordance with the drug asset forfeiture statute set forth in §§ 12-101 – 12-505 of the Criminal Procedure Article of the Annotated Code of Maryland.    (Bill No. 77-10, § 1, 11-19-2010; Bill No. 78-13, § 1, 3-13-2014)

*Each of the above laws do allow for certain exceptions, though these exceptions are limited and may not apply to most students and employees.  Those who may wish to view these exceptions are encouraged to refer to the Baltimore County Code.

Drug Conviction and Financial Aid Eligibility

Under the Higher Education Act, a student may become ineligible for federal student aid upon conviction of any offense involving the possession or sale of illegal drugs while receiving Title IV federal financial aid. Federal aid includes Federal Direct Loans, Federal Direct PLUS Loans, Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loans, Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, Federal Work-Study, and Perkins
Loans.

Penalties for Drug Convictions

Possession of Illegal Drugs

First Offense: Ineligible to receive aid for 1 year from the date of conviction

Second Offense: Ineligible to receive aid for 2 years from the date of conviction

Third and Subsequent Offenses: Indefinite ineligibility from the date of conviction

Sale of Illegal Drugs

First Offense: Ineligible to receive aid for 2 years from the date of conviction

Second and Subsequent Offenses: Indefinite ineligibility from the date of conviction

How to Regain Eligibility

A student can regain eligibility for federal student aid funds by successfully completing a drug rehabilitation program. To be sufficient to reinstate financial aid eligibility, the program must include at least 2 unannounced drug tests AND be recognized as a Federal, State, or local government agency program. A student will regain eligibility on the date of successfully completing the program.

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

A question on the FAFSA form asks if the student has ever been convicted of a drug-related offense. Failure to answer this question will automatically disqualify the student from receiving Federal aid. Falsely answering this question, if discovered, could result in fines up to $20,000, imprisonment, or both.

Convictions During Enrollment

According to the United States Department of Education, if a student is convicted of a drug offense after receiving Federal aid, he or she must notify the Financial Aid Department student and will be ineligible for further aid and required to pay back all aid received after the conviction.

Health Risks Associated with the Abuse of Alcohol

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) provides detailed information regarding the health risks associated with the abuse of alcohol. The information provided below was taken directly from their website and was retrieved on July 15, 2021.

The NIAAA provides the following information on how alcohol can affect your body:

Brain: Alcohol interferes with the brain’s communication pathways, and can affect the way the brain looks and works. These disruptions can change mood and behavior, and make it harder to think clearly and move with coordination.

Heart: Drinking a lot over time or too much on a single occasion can damage the heart, causing problems including: cardiomyopathy (stretching and drooping of heart muscle); arrhythmias (irregular heart beat); stroke; and high blood pressure.

Liver: Heavy drinking takes a toll on the liver, and can lead to a variety of problems and liver inflammation including: steatosis, or fatty liver; alcoholic hepatitis; fibrosis; and cirrhosis.

Pancreas: Alcohol causes the pancreas to produce toxic substances that can eventually lead to pancreatitis, a dangerous inflammation and swelling of the blood vessels in the pancreas that prevents proper digestion.

Cancer: The NIAAA notes that based on extensive reviews of research studies, there is a strong scientific consensus of an association between alcohol drinking and several types of cancer, including the following: head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer, liver cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer.

Immune System: Drinking too much can weaken your immune system, making your body a much easier target for disease. Drinking a lot on a single occasion slows your body’s ability to ward off infections – even up to 24 hours after getting drunk.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has developed College Drinking, an important and timely document that focuses on alcohol misuse among college students.

References:

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. (n.d.). Alcohol’s Effects on the Body. Retrieved from https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/alcohols-effects-body on 2021, July 15.

Health Risks Associated with Heroin

On March 1, 2017, the Governor of Maryland, Larry Hogan, declared a state of emergency in response to the opioid epidemic in Maryland. While detailed information is provided below, interested readers can learn more about how the state of Maryland is combatting the heroin and opioid crisis by visiting http://beforeitstoolate.maryland.gov/.

Maryland’s Crisis Hotline is available 24 hours/7 days a week to provide support, guidance and assistance on how to access Substance Use Disorder services, in addition to the current mental health crisis services provided by this hotline. Callers will also be given information about naloxone, recovery support and family services as available/appropriate in the individual’s local area.

Naloxone is a life-saving medication that can quickly restore the breathing of a person experiencing an opioid overdose. Opioids are a group of drugs that include heroin and prescription medications like oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine, fentanyl and methadone. Naloxone is available as a generic drug or under the brand names NARCAN® and EVZIO®. Anyone can get naloxone at a Maryland pharmacy without a prescription. More information regarding how to procure Naloxone from a pharmacy is available here.

For a step-by-step guide describing how to respond to an opioid overdose with Naloxone, click here.

What is Heroin?

The Center of Disease Control (CDC) and National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) provide substantial information regarding the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs. information provided below was taken directly from their websites and was retrieved on July 15, 2021.

According to the CDC, heroin is an illegal, highly addictive opioid drug. A heroin overdose can cause slow and shallow breathing, coma, and death. People often use heroin along with other drugs or alcohol. This practice is especially dangerous because it increases the risk of overdose. Heroin is typically injected but is also smoked and snorted. When people inject heroin, they are at risk of serious, long-term viral infections such as HIV, Hepatitis C, and Hepatitis B, as well as bacterial infections of the skin, bloodstream, and heart.

Important Points to Remember About Heroin (NIDA webpage entitled DrugFacts: Heroin)

  • Heroin is an opioid drug made from morphine, a natural substance taken from the seed pod of various opium poppy plants.
  • Heroin can be a white or brown powder, or a black sticky substance known as black tar heroin.
  • People inject, snort, or smoke heroin. Some people mix heroin with crack cocaine, a practice called speedballing.
  • Heroin enters the brain rapidly and binds to opioid receptors on cells located in many areas, especially those involved in feelings of pain and pleasure and in controlling heart rate, sleeping, and breathing.
  • Short-Term Effects: People who use heroin report feeling a “rush” (or euphoria). However, other common effects include dry mouth, heavy feelings in the arms and legs, and clouded mental functioning.
  • Long-term effects may include collapsed veins for people who inject the drug, infection of the heart lining and valves, abscesses, and lung complications.
  • Research suggests that misuse of prescription opioid pain medicine is a risk factor for starting heroin use.
  • A person can overdose on heroin. Naloxone is a medicine that can treat a heroin overdose when given right away, though more than one dose may be needed.
  • Heroin is highly addictive. Withdrawal symptoms – which can begin as early as a few hours after the drug was last taken – include severe muscle and bone pain, sleep problems, diarrhea and vomiting, and severe heroin cravings.
  • A range of treatments including medicines and behavioral therapies are effective in helping people stop heroin use. However, treatment plans should be individualized to meet the needs of the patient.
References:

Before it’s too late. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://beforeitstoolate.maryland.gov/what-you-need-to-know-about-naloxone-2/ on 2021, July 15.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021, March 18). Heroin. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/opioids/heroin.html on 2021, July 15.

NIDA. (2021, June). Heroin. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/heroin on 2021, July 15.

Health Risks Associated with Prescription Opioids

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides substantial information regarding the misuse of prescription opioids. The information provided below was taken directly from their website and was retrieved on August 13, 2020.

Prescription opioids can be used to treat moderate-to-severe pain and are often prescribed following surgery or injury, or for health conditions such as cancer. In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the acceptance and use of prescription opioids for the treatment of chronic, non-cancer pain, such as back pain or osteoarthritis, despite serious risks and the lack of evidence about their long-term effectiveness.

Anyone who takes prescription opioids can become addicted to them. In fact, as many as one in four patients receiving long-term opioid therapy in a primary care setting struggles with opioid addiction. Once addicted, it can be hard to stop. In 2016, more than 11.5 million Americans reported misusing prescription opioids in the past year.

Taking too many prescription opioids can stop a person’s breathing—leading to death.

In addition to the serious risks of addiction, abuse, and overdose, the use of prescription opioids can have a number of side effects, even when taken as directed including, but not limited to, the following: constipation; nausea, vomiting, and dry mouth; sleepiness and dizziness; confusion; and depression.

References

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017, August 29).  Prescription Opioids.  Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/opioids/prescribed.html on 2020, August 13

Health Risks Associated with Marijuana

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) provides substantial information regarding marijuana. The information provided below was taken directly from the NIDA website and was retrieved on August 13, 2020.

Marijuana is the most commonly used psychotropic drug in the United States, after alcohol. Its use is widespread among young people. In 2018, more than 11.8 million young adults used marijuana in the past year.

Short Term Effects of Marijuana Usage on the Brain:

THC acts on specific brain cell receptors that ordinarily react to natural THC-like chemicals. These natural chemicals play a role in normal brain development and function.  Marijuana over-activates parts of the brain that contain the highest number of these receptors. This causes the “high” that people feel. Other effects include:

  • altered senses (for example, seeing brighter colors)
  • altered sense of time
  • changes in mood
  • impaired body movement
  • difficulty with thinking and problem-solving
  • impaired memory
  • hallucinations (when taken in high doses)
  • delusions (when taken in high doses)
  • psychosis (when taken in high doses)

Long Term Effects of Marijuana Usage on the Brain:

Marijuana also affects brain development. When people begin using marijuana as teenagers, the drug may impair thinking, memory, and learning functions and affect how the brain builds connections between the areas necessary for these functions. Researchers are still studying how long marijuana’s effects last and whether some changes may be permanent.

Physical Effects of Marijuana Usage:

  • Breathing problems. Marijuana smoke irritates the lungs, and people who smoke marijuana frequently can have the same breathing problems as those who smoke tobacco. These problems include daily cough and phlegm, more frequent lung illness, and a higher risk of lung infections. Researchers so far haven’t found a higher risk for lung cancer in people who smoke marijuana.
  • Increased heart rate. Marijuana raises heart rate for up to 3 hours after smoking. This effect may increase the chance of heart attack. Older people and those with heart problems may be at higher risk.
  • Problems with child development during and after pregnancy. Marijuana use during pregnancy is linked to lower birth weight and increased risk of both brain and behavioral problems in babies. If a pregnant woman uses marijuana, the drug may affect certain developing parts of the fetus’s brain.

Mental Effects of Marijuana Usage:

Long-term marijuana use has been linked to mental illness in some users, such as:

  • temporary hallucinations
  • temporary paranoia
  • worsening symptoms in patients with schizophrenia – a severe mental disorder with symptoms such as hallucinations, paranoia, and disorganized thinking
References

National Institute on Drug Abuse (2019, December).  Marijuana. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/marijuana on 2020, August 13.

Health Risks Associated with Prescription Drug Misuse & Abuse

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) provides helpful and relevant information regarding prescription drug misuse and abuse. The information provided below was taken directly from the NIDA website and was retrieved on August 13, 2020.

According to the NIDA, the misuse of prescription drugs means taking a medication in a manner or dose other than prescribed; taking someone else’s prescription, even if for a legitimate medical complaint such as pain; or taking a medication to feel euphoria (i.e., to get high). The term nonmedical use of prescription drugs also refers to these categories of misuse. The three classes of medication most commonly misused are:

  • opioids—usually prescribed to treat pain
  • central nervous system [CNS] depressants (this category includes tranquilizers, sedatives, and hypnotics)—used to treat anxiety and sleep disorders
  • stimulants—most often prescribed to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Prescription drug misuse can have serious medical consequences. Increases in prescription drug misuse over the last 15 years are reflected in increased emergency room visits, overdose deaths associated with prescription drugs, and treatment admissions for prescription drug use disorders, the most severe form of which is an addiction. Overdose deaths involving prescription opioids were five times higher in 2016 than in 1999.

References

National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2020, June). Misuse of Prescription Drugs Research Report Overview. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/misuse-prescription-drugs/overview on 2020, August 13.

Health Risks Associated with the Use of Tobacco Products

The Center for Disease Control provides substantial information regarding tobacco use. The information provided below was taken directly from their website and was retrieved on July 15, 2021.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

  • Smoking leads to disease and disability and harms nearly every organ of the body
  • More than 16 million Americans are living with a disease caused by smoking.
  • Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death
  • Smoking causes cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung diseases, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis.
  • Many adult cigarette smokers want to quit smoking. Helpful information for those who wish to quit smoking may be found here.
References

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2021, June 2). Smoking and Tobacco Use: Fast Facts. Retrieved from
https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fast_facts/index.htm on 2021, July 15.

Health Risks Associated with the Use of Synthetic Cannabinoids

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) provides helpful information regarding the adverse health risks associated with the use of synthetic cannabinoids. The information provided below was taken directly from the NIDA website and was retrieved on August 13, 2020.

Synthetic cannabinoids are human-made mind-altering chemicals that are either sprayed on dried, shredded plant material so they can be smoked or sold as liquids to be vaporized and inhaled in e-cigarettes and other devices. These products are also known as herbal or liquid incense.

These chemicals are called cannabinoids because they are similar to chemicals found in the marijuana plant. Because of this similarity, synthetic cannabinoids are sometimes misleadingly called “synthetic marijuana” (or “fake weed”), and they are often marketed as safe, legal alternatives to that drug. In fact, they are not safe and may affect the brain much more powerfully than marijuana; their actual effects can be unpredictable and, in some cases, more dangerous or even life-threatening.

People who have used synthetic cannabinoids and have been taken to emergency rooms have shown severe effects including: rapid heart rate; vomiting; violent behavior; and suicidal thoughts.  Synthetic cannabinoids can also raise blood pressure and cause reduced blood supply to the heart, as well as kidney damage and seizures. Use of these drugs is associated with a rising number of deaths.

References

National Institute on Drug Abuse (2020, June).  Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Drug Facts.  Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/synthetic-cannabinoids-k2spice on 2020, August 13.

Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Programs Available to Students & Employees

Students

Stevenson provides alcohol and drug education to all new students through new student orientation and through the students’ required completion of the online educational program MyStudentBody.com. MyStudentBody, which is a required component of the Stevenson University health profile, focuses on three areas: alcohol, drugs and sexual violence.

Throughout the academic year, Stevenson strives to supplement the programs delivered during new student orientation by offering programming and awareness campaigns on the topics of substance abuse. Programming during 2020-2021 academic year was limited due to challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. An example of programming that did take place was the NCAA Freshman Experience which was completed by all first-year student-athletes (freshmen and transfer) during the fall 2020 semesterThe Freshman Experience is an online health and wellness resource for first-year student-athletes that was developed by the NCAA’s Sport Science Institute. Through this programming, the first-year student-athletes received a wide range of prevention education including a specific module focused on alcohol and other drugs. In addition, alcohol awareness is a mandatory component of the programs that students joining a fraternity of sorority must complete. Finally, Resident Assistants often create bulletin boards on their floors to share pertinent educational information related to alcohol and other drugs.

Stevenson University’s Office of Residence Life, in collaboration with the Wellness Center, provides alcohol education to students who are found responsible for violating the University’s Alcohol Policy. Stevenson University utilizes the Informed Choices Alcohol Education Workshop for students found responsible for a first-time alcohol violation. Informed Choices is an interactive, discussion based workshop designed to empower students to make the best-informed decisions about alcohol consumption. The goal of the program is to further educate students on the impact alcohol has on their own bodies and in their communities, both on and off-campus. In addition, one-on-one education is provided when students violate the University’s alcohol policy a second time as well as in cases of significant first-time alcohol violations.

Students who violate Stevenson University’s drug policy, and who are permitted to remain enrolled at the University, are typically required to participate in a University sponsored drug education class facilitated by the Office of Residence Life. This class is an interactive workshop designed to help students understand the risks associated with illegal drugs and empower them to make the best-informed decisions they can make surrounding the use or abuse of illegal drugs. The goal of the program is to educate students on how drugs impact their mind, body and community as well as the impact it can have on their potential career prospects. If students continue to violate Stevenson University’s drug policy, they may be referred for education and treatment from a University approved off-campus provider or be removed from housing or suspended/expelled from the University.

Stevenson has a Substance Awareness Task Force (SATF) that meets on a monthly basis. The task force includes representatives from the faculty, staff, and student body. The mission of the task force is to support and promote healthy & safe life choices for all faculty, staff & students of the Stevenson community through educational resources, alternative programming and positive reinforcement.

Finally, there are numerous off-campus resources that students may wish to explore, including those noted below. Students may contact Stevenson University’s Wellness Center for assistance in evaluating these options.

1. SAMSHA, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, provides a Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator, which is a confidential and anonymous source of information for persons seeking treatment facilities in the United States or U.S. Territories for substance abuse/addiction and/or mental health problems.

2. SAMSHA also offers free and confidential information in English and Spanish for individuals and family members facing substance abuse and mental health issues, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To access SAMHSA’s National Helpline, call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or use 1-800-487-4889 (TTY).

3. Maryland’s Crisis Hotline is available 24 hours/7 days a week to provide support, guidance and assistance on how to access Substance Use Disorder services, in addition to the current mental health crisis services provided by this hotline. Callers will also be given information about naloxone, recovery support and family services as available/appropriate in the individual’s local area. Call 211 and press 1 to access this crisis hotline.

4. Maryland’s Behavioral Health Administration offers valuable resources related to drug treatment and drug prevention.

5. For a free support and resource to stop smoking call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) or visit smokefree.gov/.

6. Students also have the option to seek confidential support for managing life’s challenges by utilizing the Student Assistance Program. Support is available by calling 1-800-327-2251 or by visiting https://portal.bhsonline.com and entering the username StevensonU.

Employees

Employees may access alcohol and drug resources through Stevenson’s Employee Assistance
Program whichprovides Stevenson employees free, confidential 24/7 support to help manage life’s challenges. Employees may access by the EAP by visiting https://portal.bhsonline.com and enter the username StevensonU to begin, or calling 1-800-327-2251. Employees seeking additional information on this confidential service are encouraged to contact the Office of Human Resources.

There are also numerous off-campus resources that employees may choose to explore, including those noted below.

1. SAMSHA, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, provides a Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator, which is a confidential and anonymous source of information for persons seeking treatment facilities in the United States or U.S. Territories for substance abuse/addiction and/or mental health problems.

2. SAMSHA also offers free and confidential information in English and Spanish for individuals and family members facing substance abuse and mental health issues, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To access SAMHSA’s National Helpline, call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or use 1-800-487-4889 (TTY).

3. Maryland’s Crisis Hotline is available 24 hours/7 days a week to provide support, guidance and assistance on how to access Substance Use Disorder services, in addition to the current mental health crisis services provided by this hotline. Callers will also be given information about naloxone, recovery support and family services as available/appropriate in the individual’s local area. Call 211 and press 1 to access this crisis hotline.

4. Maryland’s Behavioral Health Administration offers valuable resources related to drug treatment and drug prevention.

5. For a free support and resource to stop smoking call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) or visit smokefree.gov/.

Distribution of the Annual Notification

Stevenson University’s Drug and Alcohol Prevention program will be distributed to the entire Stevenson University community (all students, faculty and staff) in accordance with the below procedures. Stevenson University’s Associate Vice President for Student Affairs & Dean of Students will be responsible for ensuring the timely distribution of the Drug and Alcohol Prevention program.

Students

1. At the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, the entire Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention program will be emailed to all students (undergraduate and graduate/accelerated) enrolled in the institution. This email will be sent on the first day of the third week of the fall and spring semesters in order to allow for the completion of the add/drop period and thus ensuring all enrolled students receive this notification.

2. At the beginning of each non-traditional academic term, a separate email will be sent to new students enrolled in each of these terms in order to ensure they receive the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention program. Examples of non-traditional terms at Stevenson University currently consist of “8-week 1”, “8-week 2”, “5-week 2”, “Winterim” and the various summer terms. Students who are enrolled in “8-week 1” will be included in the email that will be sent the first day of the third week of the fall and spring semesters as described in number 1 above. Students enrolled in the other non-traditional terms, and who were not enrolled when the email was sent during the third week of the fall/spring semester, will receive an email that includes the entire Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention program. These emails will be sent two-days after the conclusion of the add-drop period for each of these terms. The Dean of Students will collaborate with the Registrar’s Office in order to produce an accurate list of students who should be included on these additional distributions.

3. A webpage has been created on Stevenson University’s external webpage at www.stevenson.edu and the internal portal page (SUNow Portal) detailing Stevenson University’s Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention program. The direct link to the page on the external website is: www.stevenson.edu/alcohol-drugs. These webpages have been created to facilitate ease of access. All e-mail notifications will provide a direct link to the external webpage: www.stevenson.edu/alcohol-drugs.

Employees

1.  At the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, the entire Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention program will be emailed to all employees employed at the institution.  This email will be sent on the first day of the third week of the fall and spring semesters. 

2.  Employees will also receive information on where to access the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention program and an overview of the program at their new employee orientation.  By including this information in new employee orientation, Stevenson will ensure that employees who are hired at times following the distribution of the emails are informed of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention program.

3  A webpage has been created on Stevenson University’s external webpage at www.stevenson.edu and the internal portal page (SUNow Portal) detailing Stevenson University’s Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention program. The direct link to the page on the external website is:  www.stevenson.edu/alcohol-drugs.  These webpages have been created to facilitate ease of access.  All e-mail notifications will provide a direct link to the external webpage: www.stevenson.edu/alcohol-drugs.

Biennial Review

Stevenson University is an innovative, coeducational, independent institution offering undergraduate and graduate students a career-focused education marked by individualized attention, civility, and respect for difference. In order to achieve our mission, the health and safety of members of the Stevenson University community are of primary concern to the institution. The primary goal of Stevenson’s drug and alcohol program is to help all members of the community understand the health risks associated with the abuse of alcohol and illicit drugs and to provide appropriate support and resources for those members who may be struggling with their own usage. In order to fulfill this primary goal, Stevenson strives to develop, articulate and enforce clear policies for students and employees. Further, the institution seeks to provide relevant and effective educational programs for members of the university community, particularly students, surrounding the impact of abusing alcohol and illicit drugs.

In accordance with the U.S. Department of Education’s Drug-Free School and Communities Act, combined with Stevenson’s primary interest in the safety of the members of the campus community, Stevenson University will complete a biennial review of its drug and alcohol abuse prevention program. The biennial review is conducted in order to: (a) Determine the DAAPP’s effectiveness and implement changes to the program if the changes are needed; (b) Determine the number of drug and alcohol-related violations and fatalities that occur on the institution’s campus (as defined in 20 U.S.C. § 1029(f)(6)), or as part of any of the institution’s activities and are reported to campus officials; (c) Determine the number and type of sanctions described above that are imposed by the institution as a result of drug and alcohol-related violations and fatalities on the institution’s campus or as part of any of the institution’s activities; and (d) Ensure that the sanctions required are consistently enforced.

The biennial review is conducted by the Office of Student Affairs in collaboration with Stevenson University’s Substance Awareness Task Force. The Substance Awareness Task Force is a committee chaired by Stevenson University’s Assistant Vice-President, Wellness Center. The selection of the AVP of the Wellness Center to chair this task force was purposeful, as she is both a registered nurse and a professional counselor. Further, as the leader of the Wellness Center, the AVP provides overall supervision to Stevenson’s mental health counselors and medical providers. The membership of the Substance Awareness Task Force includes the following: Vice President, Student Affairs; Associate Vice President, Student Affairs & Dean of Students; Assistant Vice President, Wellness Center; Director of Security; Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs & Conduct; and at least one representative from each of the following campus constituencies: Faculty, Athletics, Human Resources; Residence Life, and Student Government.

Last Updated August 9, 2021