The Stevenson University Public History Program has a secret weapon at the National Guard Museum of the United States-- Ryan Trainor.   Working with Stevenson's Admissions program while earning his MLS, Ryan was also a volunteer in the University Archives.  Since that time, Ryan has earned his graduate degree and has been employed as an Archivist and Museum Specialist with the National Guard Memorial Library & Museum in Washington, D.C. 

Ryan has always been interested in military history, particularly the Battle of the Little Big Horn.  We've shared many hours in the Stevenson archives talking about military history as Ryan gained the archival experience so necessaary to his graduate degree.  Based largely upon his degree and his experience, he was hired by the National Guard Memorial Library and Museum. His daily job involves--among a number of other things--operating one of the finest collections regarding the history of the National Guard in the United States.

Our paths crossed again when we delivered an exhibit commemorating the defense of Baltimore in 1814 to the National Guard Museum.  Developed by the Maryland Military Historical Society, the exhibit is an example of the successful strategic alliance between the Maryland Military Historical Society (MMHS) and the Stevenson Public History Program.  Among other things, our Public History majors and faculty work with the MMHS to further their committment to history education of the public.  This is accomplished through internships and in-kind donations of time and materials from Stevenson to the MMHS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   In the photo can be seen the front panel of one of the two exhibit kisoks entitled "When Free Men Shall Stand."  Taking its name from lyrics in the National Anthem, the exhibit illustrates Baltimore's defense during the War of 1812. 

Seen with the exhibit are (from L to R)

Anne C Armstrong, Deputy Director of the National Guard Educational Foundation; 

LTC Kerry McIntyre (USA Ret.), Board Member of the Maryland Military Historical Society;

Ryan Trainor, Archivist & Museum Specialist with The National Guard Memorial Library and Museum; and

Glenn T Johnston, Chair, Stevenson Public History. 

I would like to thank Anne and Ryan for their committment to public history and telling the story of the National Guard in the U.S.  We have found yet another wonderful public history venue at which our majors can intern, our classes can learn, and our graduates can seek employment.