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Psychology News

Keyword: students

“The Orsia F. Young Leadership Award is conferred on one graduating student from each academic school who has performed in an outstanding manner as a leader in the university community, initiated action, motivated others to do so, and has been an agent for positive change in the university.”

This year, we are happy to announce that our Psych major Tranel Robinson has received the Orsia F. Young Leadership award.

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During the past four years, Tranel has been a highly engaged member of our campus community, and has grown into a confident and effective leader. In terms of formal leadership roles, Tranel has been a member of the SGA Junior Class Council, Vice President of the Sovereign Stangs Step Team, and a Mentor for Mustang Mentors. In addition, she has served as a Freshman Orientation Leader, the Student Coordinator for Clubs and Organizations, and President of Stevenson’s Chapter of the National Society of Leadership and Success. In addition to these leadership roles, Tranel is a Technology Supervisor here at Stevenson, where she is responsible for supervising a staff of 14 student employees. She has received multiple honors for her outstanding work, including Student of the Month by the National Resident Hall Honorary, Student Employee of the Month (twice), and recognition as a National Engaged Leader by the National Society of Leadership and Success.

In each of these roles, Tranel has shined as a leader, particularly in her ability to initiate action, motivate others to do so, and be an agent for positive change. Her consistent leadership involvement over the past four years and the diverse experiences she has highlights her ability to be a true and effective leader in multiple contexts. Congratulations Tranel! You deserve this award!

By: Dr. Virginia Iannone

The National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS) is an organization that aims to build leaders through a leadership development program. This program consists of an interactive leadership training day, speaker broadcasts from well-known industry leaders, and building successful networking teams. After completing the leadership development sequence, members are inducted into the society and given the option to advance their skills through participation on the executive board. Many of our members flourish all around campus by partaking in campus events, completing community service, and serving in leadership positions. While NSLS welcomes students from different majors, the psychology department has consistently been well-represented.

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Tranel Robinson

Last month, NSLS hosted a spring induction ceremony which consisted of 75 students; many of whom were psychology students. Additionally, Psychology Professor Dr. Virginia Iannone presented a keynote address that emphasized the importance of character development in leadership. Dr. Iannone was also recognized as an honorary member for her commitment to empowering and mentoring student leaders. As the former president of the Stevenson chapter of the NSLS and a senior psychology student, I found that some of the themes about leadership mentioned during the induction ceremony echoed a lot of the concepts that I have learned as a psychology major.

For the past 2.5 years, I have been serving as the President of NSLS. It has been my privilege to work closely with a diverse group of students. Our former vice president, LaDena Eames, is also a senior psychology student. Two of our newly appointed e-board members, Lauren Hudson and T'Niya Lawson, are also psychology students who have big goals of empowering fellow students to become leaders of the world. Looking back, our executive board has done an exceptional job in promoting the importance of leadership training.

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NSLS Induction Ceremony 2019 with Dr. Iannone as keynote speaker (Top Right)

Students may perhaps be wondering how they can be members. Students will receive invitations to join NSLS based on their student status and GPA. Students who are interested in learning more about NSLS may contact Lauren Hudson and/or T’Niya Lawson.

By: Tranel Robinson (’19 Psychology)

Psychology professors regularly select students to serve as a Peer Teaching Assistant (PTA) in some of the courses that they teach, including PSY 136- Statistics for Behavioral and Social Science, PSY 201- Writing for Psychology, PSY 262- Social Psychology, PSY 261- Biological Psychology, and PSY 343- Research Methods-Data Analysis II.

What exactly does a PTA do? Although the duties of PTAs differ slightly for each course, it is relatively common for PTAs to attend every class, take attendance, hold office hours, lecture or lead discussion, and perform office duties such as print, copy, and send emails. In addition, PTAs may also be available to serve as tutors to ensure students are staying up to date with their assignments and preparing well for exams.

What can students gain by serving as a PTA? Being a PTA allows students to build working relationships with their Psychology professors, which is especially important if students are planning to attend graduate school. For a lot of graduate programs, having teaching experiences will enhance your chance of getting in.

Alicia Hughart, Senior Psychology Major and Active Minds president, took part in being a PTA for PSY 262- Social Psychology where she worked inside and outside of the classroom. Alicia utilized being a PTA for field placement credit, in which she worked alongside Dr. Schurtz to create conceptual exams, review students’ papers, and even conduct lectures. Due to her completing this assistantship for field placement credit, she is required to create a poster presentation that she will present in May. Completing this poster and presenting it provides students with professional presentation experiences that they can add to their CVs!

Alicia and Dr Schurtz

Alicia Hughart and Dr. Schurtz

For me as a Junior Psychology major, I am currently completing a teaching assistantship alongside with Dr. Wong for PSY 201- Writing in Psychology. My duties consist of facilitating class discussions, reading student’s papers, working with students inside and outside of the classroom to ensure they are understanding empirical articles, and completing various office tasks. During my time as a PTA through field placement credit, my relationship with Dr. Wong has strengthened, I was able to achieve my personal goals, and I truly believe I gained essential interpersonal skills I can utilize as I continue my undergraduate degree.

Makaylah and Dr Wong

Makaylah Morton and Dr. Wong

In sum, if you are completing a course that currently has a PTA and you are interested in becoming one, talk to your professor and inquire about the duties expected. Ensuring you are working hard in your course, receiving a good grade, and participating in class discussion is a great way to set yourself apart to be offered such position!

By: Makaylah Morton

Active Minds is one of our nation’s premier nonprofit organizations that supports mental health awareness and education for students. Here at our Stevenson chapter, we are dedicated to changing the conversation and reducing the stigma surrounding mental health. This includes, but is not limited to, types of mental illnesses, histories of an individual that can lead to a change in mental health, and treatments. We as a club are devoted to saving lives and building a strong and impactful community to create a lasting change in how mental health is viewed. We believe that this can be done through education, research, and advocacy for those who need that support. We host a wide range of events throughout the semester to promote these concepts. Events include mental health tables and stress-less weeks, which are dedicated to decreasing stress and anxiety around midterms and finals week.

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2018-2019 Active Minds Officers and Members

As described on the Active Minds website: “We believe no one should have to struggle alone. By empowering students to speak openly about mental health, we can reduce stigma, encourage help seeking, and prevent suicides”. Through Active Minds, we hope to open people’s minds and hearts to issues related to mental health.

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Nya Medley (left) and Active Minds President Alicia Hughart (right)

By: Alicia Hughart

I have always enjoyed presenting posters. I first presented a poster project when I was eight and poster projects have always been my favorite part of school. Being able to research a specific topic and add my own creative influence to a plain white board has always made we feel so accomplished. I never knew that attending poster presentations would be so rewarding as well... On March 29 2019, I attended the wonderful Paul D. Lack Scholars’ Day poster presentation at the Manning Academic Center.

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Psychology Student Jenny Tran

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Psychology Student Danielle Gershman

When I first heard about this event, I knew that this showcase would highlight many research topics from varying students and faculty, but I was not sure the exact topics that would be presented. When I started to walk around the posters, I was flabbergasted by how the presenters were speaking so fluently, energetically, and cheerfully about their work. I discussed with many presenters about their different research topics and have learned so many new things. For example, I now know how music can affect alcohol consumption, why people cannot recognize celebrities with tinted glasses on, and even how we should monitor what we say on social media when a celebrity dies due to suicide.

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Counseling and Human Services faculty Dr. Finkenberg and Psychology faculty Dr. Schurtz

As I toured around the different posters, one that has caught my attention was presented by Dr. Shirna Gullo. Dr. Gullo is a nursing professor here at Stevenson University, and she conducted her own study about the effects of online testing for nursing students in college. She expressed to me that in the past, nursing students were required to take exams on paper tests, however this seemed to be a severe disadvantage for the students. What teachers were seeing was that despite having passed the written exam, many students were underperforming in the actual workforce. As such, she conducted a study to see if computerized testing was more beneficial for nursing students. To see Dr. Gullo to be passionate about her research was very inspiring.

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Dr. Gullo from Nursing

Overall, I was so happy to attend to the showcase. Poster presentations are not only color or glitter on a board, but they represent a significant way to positively impact a person’s career or even their future.

By: Nya Medley

 
 
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