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Psychology News

Keyword: exceptional experiences

Meet Dr. Ryan Schurtz from the Psychology department! Dr. Schurtz teaches Research Methods, Social Psychology, as well as Aggression, Violence, and Murder. He looks forward to seeing you all in the Fall!

 

We are happy to announce, once again, our success in sending our Psychology seniors to graduate school! Here are some examples. We are so proud of you all!

Kayla Brown

Kayla Brown (’20 Psychology) will be attending University of Delaware for their School Psychology Master’s program. Kayla has also received a prestigious Graduate Scholar Award from UD. Congrats Kay!

Liliana Ferrufino

Liliana Ferrufino (’20 Psychology) will be attending James Madison University for the Master’s program in School Psychology. Congrats Liliana!

Kelly Dunworth

Kelly Dunworth (’20 Psychology) will be attending Towson University for the Master’s program in Child Life, Family Collaboration, and Administration. Congrats Kelly!

Becky Staller

Becky Staller (’20 Psychology) will be attending Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Master program in Health Science. Congrats Becky!

Julia Boateng

Julia Boateng (’20 Psychology) will be attending Stevenson University for the Master’s program in Communication Studies. Congrats Julia!

I transferred from CCBC this spring after completing a few semesters at their Essex campus. Prior to that, I was enrolled at a different university and working as a State Trooper. Once I realized that police work wasn’t for me, I joined the military. I became a medic in the military and found my passion for healthcare. During my time in the military I aspired to become more than a medic. This is when I decided I would go back to school and start on my path to becoming a Physician’s Assistant.

Dara Mazzola

Dara Mazzola ('21 Psychology)

When I was at CCBC, I completed several night and online classes. I also decided to leave the military as active duty status and join the reserves. I am so glad that I have made the decision to transfer to Stevenson. Looking back, the choice was easy for me because of their participation in the Yellow Ribbon program, availability of transfer scholarship, and acceptance of my GI Bill.

Stevenson has everything I have been looking for at a university: small class sizes, flexible class schedules, veteran friendly, and not to mention, they have a beautiful campus. I couldn’t be happier with my decision to finish my Bachelor’s degree here before applying to Physician’s Assistant schools in the area. The professors here have been extremely supportive and would go above and beyond to help in any way they can. Stevenson is really giving me a wonderful opportunity to finish the degree I started almost 13 years ago.

Interviewed by: Ethel Zepeda (’21 Psychology)

Together with our two fellow psychology students Elijah Nieto and Chris Roberts, the four of us spent a day in November working with high school students in Morgan State University’s Upward Bound Program as a part of the service-learning component of PSY 350: Psychology of the Black Experience. Taught by Dr. Leary, this course focuses on understanding the experiences of Black individuals in the U.S and globally through the lens of psychology. The students are required to draw upon the topics discussed in class and conduct an intervention to assist the students in the Upward Bound (UB) program.

UB1

Gloria Collier (in yellow shirt) and some of the UB students

UB is a program dedicated to motivating low-income, potential first-generation college students to seek higher education while simultaneously assisting them with core academics and their college application process. Mrs. McDonald, the program director, along with Dr. Elliott (who serves as a UB’s counselor), Inga Williams, and Darrin Coley, all welcomed us with open arms.

We started off with an icebreaker before implementing our intervention. The icebreaker helped us get to know the UB students a little better. After the icebreaker, we shared with the students a poster with the stages of the Nigrescence model written on it.

UB2

The poster that we shared with the UB students with the Nigrescence model

The Nigrescence model, developed by William Cross, Jr. in 1971, explains the Black identity in four stages—pre-encounter, dissonance, immersion/emersion, and internalization/internalization-commitment. The pre-encounter stage describes when a Black individual has an affinity towards all things White and a dislike toward all things associated with being Black. The dissonance stage describes the experience of the Black individual encountering an event that opens his/her eyes up to the harsh reality that Black people go through. The immersion/emersion stage refers to a Black individual who is completely emerged in Black culture and not interested in paying attention to the other cultures around him/her. The final stage internalization/internalization-commitment is one in which the Black individual is secure in the understanding of his/her Blackness and focuses on issues not only inclusive to Black people but other races and ethnicities as well.

After explaining the Nigrescence model to the UB students, each student placed their name near the stage that they felt was appropriate. Many of the students found themselves in between the stages of dissonance and immersion/emersion or immersion/emersion and internalization/internalization-commitment. Surprisingly, the stage that harbored the most students was the internalization/internalization commitment stage. Many of the students discussed how they felt this would affect them once they were in college. After listening to their stories about why they were in each stage and how their current placement in the model would affect their experience at either a historically black college or university (HBCU) or predominantly white institution (PWI), we shared with them where we saw ourselves on the model. We also explained how college has been for us as Black students at a PWI, how we have grown through stages in the Nigresence model, and how successful we have been on our journey thus far.

Overall, spending a day with the UB students was a very fulfilling experience. We found these students to be extremely thoughtful, mature, and knowledgeable. We hope that this experience impacted them as much as it has impacted us.

By: Gloria Collier and Alzariyat Abdalla

Psychology family

  • You are not a number. We know all our students by their names.
  • Class size is small and allows active learning and participation.
  • We love our students and provide quality mentoring.
  • We are a close-knit department/family.
  • We are student-focused and believe in helping students grow.
  • We listen to our students and help them achieve their dreams.
  • We are fun and positive.
  • We have a well-designed curriculum that is flexible enough for students to create their own unique experiences at Stevenson (e.g., Psychology + Professional Minor).
  • There are field placement and internship opportunities for students.
  • Students are getting an excellent education from us.

Did you know? (Data from the 2017-2018 academic year)

  • 100% of our students who applied to graduate programs were accepted into at least one program.
  • 55% of our students went directly into graduate programs. That’s more than twice the national average!
  • 95% of our graduates who were seeking employment secured jobs within 2 months.
  • 38% of university-wide graduation awards were won by Psychology majors.
  • 100% of our students presented their scholarly work in a professional setting.
  • 100% of our students complete a professional internship before graduating.

#SuccessYouCanMeasure #WeAreTheBest

 
 
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