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Psychology News

Date: Dec 2019

Congratulations to Angel Longus (’22 Psychology) for getting accepted into the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates summer program. Angel will be involved in the “Talking college: Increasing diversity in the linguistic sciences through research on language and social mobility” project and will “receive training in linguistics, preparation for graduate school, and experience in conducting original research that extends their understanding of African-American language, culture, and community.”

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We are all very excited for you Angel!

Together with our two fellow psychology students Elijah Nieto and Chris Roberts, the four of us spent a day in November working with high school students in Morgan State University’s Upward Bound Program as a part of the service-learning component of PSY 350: Psychology of the Black Experience. Taught by Dr. Leary, this course focuses on understanding the experiences of Black individuals in the U.S and globally through the lens of psychology. The students are required to draw upon the topics discussed in class and conduct an intervention to assist the students in the Upward Bound (UB) program.

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Gloria Collier (in yellow shirt) and some of the UB students

UB is a program dedicated to motivating low-income, potential first-generation college students to seek higher education while simultaneously assisting them with core academics and their college application process. Mrs. McDonald, the program director, along with Dr. Elliott (who serves as a UB’s counselor), Inga Williams, and Darrin Coley, all welcomed us with open arms.

We started off with an icebreaker before implementing our intervention. The icebreaker helped us get to know the UB students a little better. After the icebreaker, we shared with the students a poster with the stages of the Nigrescence model written on it.

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The poster that we shared with the UB students with the Nigrescence model

The Nigrescence model, developed by William Cross, Jr. in 1971, explains the Black identity in four stages—pre-encounter, dissonance, immersion/emersion, and internalization/internalization-commitment. The pre-encounter stage describes when a Black individual has an affinity towards all things White and a dislike toward all things associated with being Black. The dissonance stage describes the experience of the Black individual encountering an event that opens his/her eyes up to the harsh reality that Black people go through. The immersion/emersion stage refers to a Black individual who is completely emerged in Black culture and not interested in paying attention to the other cultures around him/her. The final stage internalization/internalization-commitment is one in which the Black individual is secure in the understanding of his/her Blackness and focuses on issues not only inclusive to Black people but other races and ethnicities as well.

After explaining the Nigrescence model to the UB students, each student placed their name near the stage that they felt was appropriate. Many of the students found themselves in between the stages of dissonance and immersion/emersion or immersion/emersion and internalization/internalization-commitment. Surprisingly, the stage that harbored the most students was the internalization/internalization commitment stage. Many of the students discussed how they felt this would affect them once they were in college. After listening to their stories about why they were in each stage and how their current placement in the model would affect their experience at either a historically black college or university (HBCU) or predominantly white institution (PWI), we shared with them where we saw ourselves on the model. We also explained how college has been for us as Black students at a PWI, how we have grown through stages in the Nigresence model, and how successful we have been on our journey thus far.

Overall, spending a day with the UB students was a very fulfilling experience. We found these students to be extremely thoughtful, mature, and knowledgeable. We hope that this experience impacted them as much as it has impacted us.

By: Gloria Collier and Alzariyat Abdalla

Did you know that one of the top reasons why young adults seek mental health services is because of the high level of stress that they experience? This semester, I have enrolled in Dr. Colleen Spada’s special topics course “Anxiety, Stress, and Relaxation.” In this course, we explore not only the different types and possible causes of stress, but also constructive coping methods in response to the experience of stress.

Dr. Spada

Dr. Spada

A highlight of this course is the opportunity to hear from different guest speakers that Dr. Spada has invited. For example, this semester we have heard from an art therapist, a yoga instructor, as well as a massage therapist! Importantly, these guest speakers did not just lecture to us, but they had incorporated various hands-on activities for us to learn more about each of these topics. Let’s take a look!

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Massage therapist Jes Raschella engaging the class in massage techniques. After practicing a few massage techniques, multiple students noted how relaxed their body felt. It seemed that our stress had melted away!

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Acupuncturist Dr. Rhonda Sapp provided a brief history of acupuncture. Psychology major Sophie Spartana volunteered to try out acupuncture on her ears. One student reported better sleep after the mini-acupuncture session from Dr. Sapp!

Taken together, I have thoroughly enjoyed Dr. Spada’s course. This course is not only highly interactive, but has also provided us with tools to manage our own stress. I would highly recommend this course!

By: Semira Nock

Psychology major Cory Jones is the wide receiver for the Stevenson football team. As a student athlete, he is working hard to balance his football practices and schoolwork.

Cory started playing football at the age of 8. The SU football team had a great season this year. The homecoming game was particularly outstanding, and Cory has made two catches and a touchdown.

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Cory Jones ('21 Psychology)

Cory always puts in 100% into all he does. He has learned that for both football and schoolwork, self-discipline is essential for achieving excellence.

Why Psychology? For Cory, he is passionate about helping others. He is particularly interested in becoming a sport psychologist in which he can help other athletes to achieve their full potential.

One thing that you may not know about Cory is that he is also an artist. He likes to create art in his free time and use spray paint as well as other art mediums to create large pieces of artwork. Cory hopes that one day he could incorporate elements of art therapy into his clinical work.

At the next football game, be sure to keep an eye out for number 84!

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Cory Jones: Number 84!

By: Olivia Webb

 
 
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