Skip Navigation

Have a Question?

Contact Admissions
Undergraduate Admissions
Owings Mills Campus
Garrison Hall North, Second Floor
1-877-468-6852

Email Admissions

  

Communication News

Keyword: careers

NonprofitsIt's not too surprising to see how many Business Communication majors are currently working in the nonprofit sector after graduation. The benefits of such a job are many, including trust in the leadership of the organization, the feeling of being valued,  treatment like a person with worth and ability, and the chance to be creative while wearing a variety of hats. Let's take a look at a few of the nonprofits where our grads are working.

Lauren Humphries - LUNGevity Foundation, community engagement
Lauren Novsak - Business Volunteers Maryland, nonprofit service coordinator
Rachel Guzman Ricketts-Uy - American Heart Association, director of development, Heart Walk
Samantha Hauf Vehslage - Towson State University, marketing and communication
Nick Farano - Prevention of Blindness Society, development and marketing
Alyssa Dahle - Stevenson University, communication enrollment management
Katie Peterson Welsh - Community College of Baltimore County, student life
Mimi Bory Tinkler - University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, Foundation
Michelle Larkin - Rollins College, integrated marketing
Rachel Reid - Calhoun State Community College, work-based learning
Hannah Rill Sturgill - Carroll Hospital, development and annual funds
Katie Amos Remenapp - American Heart Association, development
Maura Kovalcik Winebrenner - Girl Scouts of Central Maryland, brand marketing
Megan McSwain - Baltimore Area Heritage Association, outreach
Chrissy Fabiszak Hoffman - Community College of Baltimore County, office of the campus director
Lori Elgert Fabiano - St. Agnes Hospital, human resources
Emily Rosenthal Alster - St. John Catholic Parish and School, communications

 

Krystal Alexis in career videoBusiness Communication senior Krystal Alexis had a starring role in the latest Career Mentoring video from the Career Connection office. The program brings potential mentors to campus, linking them with students searching for guidance from an established professional. Students and mentors alike explained the value of the program in this video. You can see the entire video here.

Thank you note in envelopeA personal, handwritten "thank you" note can be the difference between getting the internship or job -- and being left without one. Students in either of the communication majors need to understand the importance of follow-up gratitude expressed immediately and personally.

A short, handwritten note sets you apart from your competition. It shows that you took the time to express your gratitude, look for an address, find a stamp, and send off a note. You demonstrate your thoughtfulness and appreciation to someone who took the time to interview, chat with, or mentor you. Being professional, in fact, includes showing your gratitude.

Other good advice includes making sure you send the note immediately, no more than a day or two after the meeting or exchange. In order to make it easier on yourself, purchase some correspondence cards on which you can write three simple sentences of thanks. In fact, your department has a stock of these cards and envelopes free to anyone who would like to send one!

Remember that every professional interaction you have with someone is critical -- and a personal thank you note becomes even more essential in this world of email and cybercommunication.

Images of a computerImproving your communication is essential as you step out into the world of work. Forbes' contributing writer Amy Blaschka offers some pithy words of advice for all, excerpted below, from a May 4, 2020, article.

"Stop meandering and get to the point...

Have you ever starting reading something that went to go on and on, where you struggled to figure out the author’s intent? Or maybe you’ve started watching an eight-minute video only to discover that five minutes in you’re still not sure what the poster wanted to say?

Meandering signals that you’re unorganized and unsure. Worse, you’ll lose your audience’s attention—and the opportunity to communicate. When you want to deliver a message, be intentional about it, eliminate extraneous material, and get to the point.

Focus on one takeaway

Another common communication misstep is trying to cover too much at once. A good rule of thumb is that each piece of content should revolve around one central theme. This forces you to get specific about and home in on your message. And that clarity promotes better understanding, making it easier for your audience to understand your perspective,

Switch from negative to positive

When you use positive language, you’re perceived as more likable, supportive, and caring. In contrast, using negative language paints you as critical and confrontational, even when that’s not your intent. Positive language lets someone know what you can do instead of what you can’t do. 

According to studies, positive statements are more quickly received, and they are also well-received by the audience. In addition, research shows that using positive language is a highly efficient tool for being happier and more productive.

Move from passive to active voice

Imagine if Nike changed its tagline to It was done. Not very inspiring, is it? Passive voice is just that: passive. With it, the subject is acted upon by the verb. Something happened to it; there’s no forward momentum.

Using the active voice conveys a strong, clear tone, such as Nike’s famous tagline, Just do it. There is a call to action. Action-oriented language propels us to do something rather than remain idle. Where possible, minimize passive language and use using active voice.

Incorporate evocative language

Incorporating evocative language into your repertoire opens you up to a more descriptive, interesting lexicon. Never again will you have to use “nice,” “good,” or “fine”—the four-letter milquetoasts of the word world. You’ll stand out, capture your audience’s attention, and ensure that your message will be more memorable.

Craft your story

The finest and most memorable communicators understand the power of story to convey a message... Research from Paul Zak confirms this: Stories that are personal and emotionally compelling engage more of the brain, and thus are better remembered than simply stating a set of facts. Sharing our stories help others know, like, and trust us.

If you’re looking for a way to communicate and connect better, craft a story. Because once you have your story, it changes everything, including how others perceive, pay, and promote you."

Joseph MaulerCongratulations to senior Business Communication major Joseph Mauler, who, after pursuing a minor in psychology during his years at Stevenson, has been accepted into the Master's program in Counseling at Messiah College (Mechanicsburg, Penn.). The predominantly online program in counseling "is designed to help students become competent counselors who work with clients in a variety of settings. Students will be prepared to serve others in the counseling process, develop their leadership abilities in the counseling field and seek to reconcile relationships within the counseling setting," according to the Messiah website. Joseph will begin his course work after classes are over at Stevenson.  (Photo courtesy of Joseph Mauler)
 
 
Request Info