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Biology and Environmental Science News

Date: Sep 2, 2014

Taylore Willis, a Senior Interdisciplinary Studies major with concentrations in Biology and Psychology, participated in a 9-week program at the University of Montana located in Missoula. The program was sponsored by the National Science Foundation through the Introductory Multicultural Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (IM-SURE) office. While there she worked with the university's College of Forestry and Conservation under the direction of Dr. Cara Nelson. 

The research she is performing is looking to determine spatial variation of soil nematodes in western Montana grasslands, and is anticipated to be completed by spring 2015 with the Biology Department at Stevenson University. The things Taylore values most about her experience are the opportunities she was given to build professional connections, to conduct research heavily reliant on field work, and the fact that she will receive a guaranteed acceptance to her mentor's lab for graduate school. You can follow this link for more information: http://im-sure.dbs.umt.edu/cms/index.php

“This was truly one of my best summers so far, and I am looking forward to seeing how this experience will prepare me for life after Stevenson.” –Taylore Willis

 

Congratulations to Dr. Blatch for receiving a Faculty Development Research Grant from Stevenson. Her project will help determine why only some fruit flies are able to survive with little folic acid in their diet.  She and her research students “will test the hypothesis that with little folic acid in the diet, only some fruit flies can survive to adulthood because only some individuals have the “right” kinds of microorganisms living in them, those able to provide folic acid to the flies.”  Consequently, flies inherently lacking microbes that can provide the vitamin die, which causes the higher death rates seen in flies not consuming folic acid.  They will also determine at which developmental stage(s) the flies grow faster and when they are more likely to die when they rely on folates from their microbes. Good luck this semester!

 
 
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