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Applied Mathematics News

This summer, Applied Math Senior, Gerald Roman-Gonzalez, completed his capstone internship at the Social Security Administration (SSA).  He worked in the Office of Research, Demonstration and Employment Support. During his internship, Gerald used SAS tools (software used for analytics, analyses and data management) to help SSA researchers identify homeless individuals in the disability applicant pool. Gerald had a wonderful summer at SSA!

Warmest congrats to Josh Allison, '15, on his recent engagement to Carli Castiglia, an SU alum.  Using his applied math degree, Josh is working as a Benefits Analyst at Geico in Chevy Chase, Maryland.

The Department of Mathematics and Physics  is very excited to start the 2017-2018 year! The start of a new academic year always brings wonderful energy and excitement to campus. It also gives us a fresh start with new programs, ideas, and plans.

More details will follow on this blog about our students, our activities, exciting classes and our faculty. 

WELCOME to our new students and WELCOME BACK to our returning students. We hope you’re as excited about the upcoming semester as we are!

Stevenson Math faculty Ms. Eileen McGraw and Dr. Ben Wilson attended MAA MathFest 2017 in Chicago. The conference brings together mathematicians from around the world for presentations focusing on both teaching and research in mathematics. At the conference, Dr. Wilson received a certificate for being a Project NExT Fellow, a professional development program for new or recent Ph.D.s in the mathematical sciences.  Both Ms. McGraw and Dr. Wilson attended a mini-conference within the larger meeting on the topic of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL), a teaching method used in many math courses at Stevenson.

 

The U.S. Postal Service is anticipating the upcoming total eclipse of the sun with a stamp celebrating the majesty of solar eclipses. This new stamp will be the first U.S. stamp to use thermochromic ink, which reacts to the heat of your touch. When you place your finger over the black disc on the stamp (left), the ink will change from black to clear and reveal an image of the moon (right). The image reverts back to the black disc when it cools. The stamp is a photograph of a total solar eclipse that was seen over Libya in 2006 by astrophysicist Fred Espenak.

 
 
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