Resident Assistant to Surgical Resident

“Own your education. At the end of the day, you are ultimately responsible for how it turns out,” says Surgical Resident Kevin Motz, M.D. (biology ’09), who is in his fifth year of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck surgery residency at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Moving forward, Motz plans on completing a laryngology fellowship and becoming an airway and voice surgeon. “I would like to be a clinician scientist at an academic hospital so that I can do research, take care of patients, and train the next generation of otolaryngologists.”

He looks back fondly upon his time as a student at Stevenson University. “I owe a lot of success in life to my faculty, friends, and coaches at VJC. To this day, I keep in contact with them. They are just as invested in my success now as they were when I was a student.”

Motz admits that he did not thrive during his first year on campus. “I’m not sure why I didn’t find my place that year—I suppose I lacked motivation or belief in myself and honestly, I really didn’t know how to study or be a student.” In his sophomore year, encouraged by the Director of Residence Life and his Resident Assistant (RA), Motz accepted a position in the Villa Julie Resident Life Program as an RA. “This was the best decision I could have made. It increased my responsibility and put me into a leadership role—something that I have always felt very natural doing.”

This social turning point was supplemented in the academic realm when Motz identified his academic niche in his organic chemistry and biochemistry courses that same year. He went on to teach his peers in the Supplemental Instruction Program and made the decision to pursue medical school with the support of professor and pre-med advisor Lorie Lana, M.D.

Today, Motz takes great pride in the careers that he and many of his classmates have achieved. “I think the robust global success of students in the science department speaks volumes to the faculty. It’s people like Merrie Durmowicz, Lorie Lana, Joe Matanoski, Ellen Roskes, and Susan Gorman who developed a spectacular department and inspired hundreds of students to chase their dreams and find success in any arena they pursued.”

He also is a proud member of the 2006-2007 men’s golf team that was recently inducted into the Dick Watts Athletics Hall of Fame as the “2017 Team of Tradition.” His experience as a student-athlete has had a great impact on his life beyond college. He wrote his residency application essay about his team’s appearance at the 2007 NCAA DIII tournament. He also formed close friendships with teammates and found a great mentor in his coach, Chris Ramer. “Coach Ramer has always been a tireless friend, fierce supporter, and strong advocate for me.”

It is in honor of his Stevenson family and his student experience, which set him on a path to build his career, that Motz supports the institution by giving back to the areas of the University about which he is most passionate.