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Chemistry and Biochemistry News

Keyword: career architecture

Chemistry alumna (BS ’11, MS’12) Katie Pryor has a career in the scientific industry that most students are not aware exists. Katie (above, left)  is a LCMS Product Specialist with Shimadzu Scientific Instruments, Inc. with its U.S. headquarters based out of Columbia, MD. Shimadzu is one of the largest suppliers of analytical instrumentation in the world. Katie’s specialization is in liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry (LC/MS), and she travels throughout the country sharing her knowledge and expertise. As a small part of her job at headquarters she attends expositions across the nation and sometimes internationally. She regularly attends Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, or Pittcon as it is commonly known, American Society for Mass Spectrometry Conference, the American Chemical Society National Meeting, which most recently convened in Washington, D.C, and the Society of Forensic Toxicology conference. Her traveling is not limited to just conferences, she also travels when customers need to be trained or need one-on-one help with their systems. When asked how her Stevenson degree helped her in her career, Katie said “I have to remember organic chemistry on a daily basis: learning how a compound interacts with ionization sources, or how it will travel and interact with a LC column and mobile phases. Customers are working on applications daily and it is part of my job to help them with their method development. Listen in Analytical Chemistry and Statistics as well, LCMS method development is governed by guidelines that require a lot of math and statistical data.”.  She also has the good fortune to work with a fun group of people! 

Two Chemistry Department Alumni and recent graduates from the Forensic Science Master's program presented at the Mid-Atlantic Association of Forensic Chemists Meeting last week. Nicole Heil (Biochem BS'16, MS'17) presented her research on the persistence of the explosive TNT on collected crime scene evidence and Malik Naanaa (Chem BS'16, MS'17) presented his work on synthetic cathinones, a type of street drug similar to amphetamines. 

A new seminar course in the chemistry program this year is Career Development in Chemistry. Students learn about alternative careers, directed resume, personal statement and cover letter writing, the importance of networking and social media presence and science-specific interview skills. In class last week, students took turns being the interviewer and interviewee, while a third student took notes.  Dr. Ward recorded the interview so that students can see where to make improvements.

Prospective (and some accepted!) biochemistry and chemistry majors visited campus on Saturday March 4th. Students and their families were hosted by Dr. Tracey Mason and biochemistry junior Delaney Patterson during the academic information session and were led on a tour of the Manning Academic Center afterwards by senior chemistry major Janaya Slaughter (pictured). It was great to see so many new faces at Stevenson this weekend, and we hope to see you all back this summer for Mustang Days! 

The Chemistry Department welcomed over 25 prospective chemistry and biochemistry majors to Future Stevenson Scholars Day on Saturday February 11th in the new Manning Academic Center. Students participated in some lab-based activities while their parents met the faculty. Pictured is faculty member Dr. Tim Dwyer helping students complete a biochemistry experiment with potato enzymes. Faculty, current students and alumni were on hand to meet all of the guests and happily provided information about the department and programs. 

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