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Chemistry and Biochemistry News

Keyword: career

Biochemistry senior, Kennedy Akwo, describes his summer Capstone internship:

"My internship at CVS Pharmacy involves training to become a certified Pharmacy Technician as well as assisting in the pickup, drop-off, and production of prescriptions. I enjoy working in the pharmacy and learning from pharmacists on how to be successful in the position. This internship has reinforced belief in my desire to pursue pharmacy and I couldn’t be happier." 

From Chris Zaykoski, Biochemistry Senior:

I've been working in Pathology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine here in Baltimore. Our lab's mission is to develop a reliable early detection method to find pancreatic cancer. There are no symptoms of pancreatic cancer until it has progressed to its advanced stage and metastasized to other organs. The five year survival rate is less than five percent at time of diagnosis. Within in the next decade it will become the second leading cause of cancer death in the world. The only way to improve prognosis is to detect it early but there are no current methods to detect tiny pancreatic precursor lesions. ...Click here to read more.

For her capstone experience, Biochemistry Senior, Courtney Aceto (right), is working at the Division of Malaria Research at University of Maryland Baltimore under the supervision of Dr. Amed Ouattara. The two research projects that she is working on are "Genotyping New vs Recrudescent Malaria Infections" and "Sequencing of Circumpsporozoite Protein to Distinguish New from Recrudescent Infections."  Courtney thoroughly enjoys the work that she is doing. "My capstone directly ties into my career goals of researching infectious disease as an epidemiologist. I can use this experience for both my academics and practice in the field."

Four new elements, discovered in recent years, have now been named, pending final approval.  IUPAC, The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, allows the people who discover elements to name them, provided they name the elements in one of the following categories:  mythological concepts, minerals, a place or country, a property or a scientist.

Nihonium and symbol Nh, for the element 113:  Nihon is Japanese for Japan, the place where the it was discovered.  This is the first element discovered and named after an Asian country.

Moscovium and symbol Mc, for the element 115 is for Moscow, the home of the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research.

Tennessine and symbol Ts, for the element 117 is for Tennessee, in recognition of this region's contribution to superheavy element research.

Oganesson and symbol Og, for the element 118 is for Russian nuclear physicist Yuri Oganessian.

The new names are now being reviewed by the public and formal approval by the IUPAC Council will be announced in early November.

This summer, chemistry senior Craig Winters is completing his capstone research project at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy under the supervision of Dr. Andrew Coop. He is researching nicotinic receptors and synthesizing compounds that antagonize those receptors.  The goal of the research is to develop compounds that can be injected into people who have overdosed on nicotine and other drugs so that the effect of the overdoses are negated. This research ties in with Craig's career goal of becoming a pharmaceutical chemist.  Craig is enjoying his capstone experience very much: "I enjoy doing this because it saves lives of those that do not know the harmful effects of nicotine and other harmful drugs that still have to be tested."
 

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